Siryl
sharkchunks:

The pencil sketch for Wayne Barlowe’s “Leviathan” which I prefer to the final painting. I tend to prefer nearly all of his pencil versions and original works to the finished versions.

sharkchunks:

The pencil sketch for Wayne Barlowe’s “Leviathan” which I prefer to the final painting. I tend to prefer nearly all of his pencil versions and original works to the finished versions.

bogleech:

earthquakesonmars:

paleoillustration:

Fictional animals by Wayne Barlowe, descriptions and more images here

I had never seen that aquatic one before!  It’s not even in the book!

Apparently, he’s… possibly…

…Planning an Expedition II?

Nah sadly that’s been up for as long as the others; I think it was just cut from the first book.

The aquatic one was not part of the Expedition project.  It was printed in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe along with an explanation by the artist.  I posted a scan of it last year.  Barlowe’s text explains, “I painted this creature many years before Expedition became a reality but, in hindsight, it is easy to see the later works’ ancestry.”  He ends by saying, “In the future, I may further explore the oceans of some distant world.”

The same book does indicate that there will be a sequel to Expedition, and includes one painting of it (which I also scanned for my blog).  Nothing concrete has come of it so far.  There have only been hints.  A page on Barlowe’s website includes both the aforementioned paintings beneath a heading that reads “Expedition II…?”

Whatever the case, The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe is essential reading for any Barlowe fan or anyone with a great interest in sci-fi or fantasy art.  It’s also the only way to cheaply obtain physical copies of the art of Expedition and Barlowe’s Inferno, since both are out of print and very scarce.  Some of the paintings from Expedition are reproduced better and with less cropping in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  I just can’t recommend this book enough.

"Leviathan," a 1980 portfolio piece by Wayne Douglas Barlowe first published in a Newsday article about Barlowe’s Guide to Extraterrestrials.  A large copy is reproduced in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  Note the human skeletons embedded in the bricks in the background, indicating the vast size of the monster.

"Leviathan," a 1980 portfolio piece by Wayne Douglas Barlowe first published in a Newsday article about Barlowe’s Guide to Extraterrestrials.  A large copy is reproduced in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  Note the human skeletons embedded in the bricks in the background, indicating the vast size of the monster.

Aquatic aliens by Wayne Douglas Barlowe (left) and Adolf Schaller (right).

brighter-suns:

Ebony Blisterwing by Wayne Barlow

Some days I don’t feel like doing anything except reblogging Wayne Barlowe.  This must have been scanned from The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  The Ebony Blisterwing was first published in Expedition, but as an unscannable two-page spread.  The one in Alien Life is relegated to one page, allowing the middle section to be easily seen, but has heavily increased contrast and poor color reproduction.

brighter-suns:

Ebony Blisterwing by Wayne Barlow

Some days I don’t feel like doing anything except reblogging Wayne Barlowe.  This must have been scanned from The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  The Ebony Blisterwing was first published in Expedition, but as an unscannable two-page spread.  The one in Alien Life is relegated to one page, allowing the middle section to be easily seen, but has heavily increased contrast and poor color reproduction.

frenenzacxevalo:

You have no idea how long it took me to choose which picture I was going to post.
The artist who drew this is Wayne Barlowe. There is not a single person on the planet better at drawing aliens (and actually making them look alien) and few as good at depicting hell. Check him out sometime. You’ll be doing your creativity a favor.

A sketch for the unpublished novel Thype, printed in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.

frenenzacxevalo:

You have no idea how long it took me to choose which picture I was going to post.

The artist who drew this is Wayne Barlowe. There is not a single person on the planet better at drawing aliens (and actually making them look alien) and few as good at depicting hell. Check him out sometime. You’ll be doing your creativity a favor.

A sketch for the unpublished novel Thype, printed in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.

A painting for an abortive sequel to Expedition, scanned from The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.

A painting for an abortive sequel to Expedition, scanned from The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.

An illustration of beggars in the streets of Sith (no relation), published in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  A pencil study can be seen in the appendix to Barlowe’s Guide to Extraterrestrials.  It illustrates a scene in Barlowe’s unpublished book Thype, the Chinese Democracy of sci-fi art.

An illustration of beggars in the streets of Sith (no relation), published in The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe.  A pencil study can be seen in the appendix to Barlowe’s Guide to Extraterrestrials.  It illustrates a scene in Barlowe’s unpublished book Thype, the Chinese Democracy of sci-fi art.

"Thype and a Villar" by Wayne Douglas Barlowe.

"Thype and a Villar" by Wayne Douglas Barlowe.