Siryl
titleknown:

siryl:

Painting by Don Ivan Punchatz of the M-113 Creature from the original Star Trek episodes “The Man Trap” and “The Squire of Gothos.”  The original costume was designed and fabricated by Wah Chang.  Punchatz does an amazing job of making the creature lifelike without deviating significantly from its onscreen appearance.
Taken from the 1989 book Worlds of the Federation by Shane Johnson, which is full of interesting information about the Star Trek universe and illustrations of life-forms mentioned but never seen.  This material was almost completely ignored by subsequent episodes, movies, and books (although some lineart appeared in Keiko O’Brien’s classroom on Deep Space Nine).  More scans from the book can be found here. 

I know it’s really good monster art, but all I can think of when I see this is “So, draw me like one of your french girls Jack.”

titleknown:

siryl:

Painting by Don Ivan Punchatz of the M-113 Creature from the original Star Trek episodes “The Man Trap” and “The Squire of Gothos.”  The original costume was designed and fabricated by Wah Chang.  Punchatz does an amazing job of making the creature lifelike without deviating significantly from its onscreen appearance.

Taken from the 1989 book Worlds of the Federation by Shane Johnson, which is full of interesting information about the Star Trek universe and illustrations of life-forms mentioned but never seen.  This material was almost completely ignored by subsequent episodes, movies, and books (although some lineart appeared in Keiko O’Brien’s classroom on Deep Space Nine).  More scans from the book can be found here.

I know it’s really good monster art, but all I can think of when I see this is “So, draw me like one of your french girls Jack.”

A Star Trek novel cover by Chris Moore of the Young Artists.  The lighting and juxtaposition of elements are exquisite (though fans might have something to say about a Constitution-class starship flying so close to a planetary surface).

A Star Trek novel cover by Chris Moore of the Young Artists.  The lighting and juxtaposition of elements are exquisite (though fans might have something to say about a Constitution-class starship flying so close to a planetary surface).

The short story “Arena” by Fredric Brown appeared in Astounding Science Fiction Magazine in 1944, and was loosely adapted into the Star Trek episode of the same name which first aired in 1967.  This illustration by David Schleinkofer accompanied a 1980 reprinting of the story (by which time Astounding had changed its name to Analog).

The short story “Arena” by Fredric Brown appeared in Astounding Science Fiction Magazine in 1944, and was loosely adapted into the Star Trek episode of the same name which first aired in 1967.  This illustration by David Schleinkofer accompanied a 1980 reprinting of the story (by which time Astounding had changed its name to Analog).